Tag Archives: compact system camera

Nikon is launching a full frame mirrorless

14 Jul

Nikon confirmed they are working on a mirrorless camera. While sometimes news have been blown out of proportion in the photo industry in the past, it seems likely in this case that they really mean they’re working on a new camera system. Nikon is not a company to throw up clickbait.

So how do I know the camera they’re working on is full frame? They said the camera would be Nikon-rashii, or Nikonish. Nikon has never made a medium format camera, so we can safely exclude that. Nikon is now best remembered for the F series, which dominated journalism for a decade or two.

But this is not about reliving the past. This is about competing in the current market. How many mirrorless systems are competing for the APS-C space? Mainly three – Fujifilm, Sony, and old rival Canon. How many are competing for full frame? Really only one – Sony. Nikon knows that there are things it can do better than Sony, ways to compete with Sony. When push comes to shove, maybe Sony won’t give them the sensors they want – maybe they’ll have to turn to Toshiba or Renesas. But for a company with Nikon’s heritage and customer relations, it would be way better to start in the full frame category and gain a following among professional photographers before Sony can fully convince them, than to try to mud-sling it out with Canon in the well-scoured APS-C swamp.

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Why a camera can not be small AND have a deep grip

6 Aug

I keep seeing people clamouring for a system camera with a low depth, low width and a deep grip – see for example this recent thread on a popular forum. The hope, it seems, is that a mirrorless camera can provide this. Unfortunately, that’s not so. Mirrorless camera systems are designed on the idea that with the registration distance being shorter (because there need not be a space for the mirror), lenses can also be built to a more compact design. This comes with a number of challenges, one of which is illustrated below:

Sony A7R II with Vario Tessa 16-35mm f/4 lens.

Sony A7R II with Vario Tessa 16-35mm f/4 lens.

There physically isn’t space for a deeper grip, because it will not leave enough space for the fingers to fit between the lens and camera. I’d wager that for the same reason, it would be very difficult to design a similarly short 16-35mm f/2.8 lens, and equally this may be the reason why the A7 system’s 70-200mm lens is an f/4 rather than f/2.8. You quite simply have a problem if you want to fit a fat short wide aperture lens close to the camera body and have a deep grip for chubby man-fingers (no offence intended).

So there. I hope that covers that. Next time, I think I’ll include an X-ray of the fingers. 🙂

What’s the deal with the Olympus OM-D E-M5 II?

7 Feb

E-M5_II

Olympus this week took the covers off the E-M5 Mark II, which features a new mode where, over the course of one second, eight 16 megapixel images are taken and composited together into a 40 megapixel image. Between exposures, the sensor is moved a small amount, which allows more pixels to be simulated than are actually present on the sensor. This technology has been previously used on Hasselblad digital medium format cameras.

The new mode will mostly be useful to landscape, architecture, still life and product photographers due to its long recording duration. Imaging Resource has published a comparison of the new mode against the capability of the Nikon D810. The main conclusion seems to be that the Olympus mode lags the D810 in terms of dynamic range and spatial resolution (sharpness) although it has been pointed out that setting the Olympus lens at f/8 may have favoured the Nikon. Another less formal comparison against the Pentax 645Z shows similar differences.

The OM-D E-M5 Mark II’s native resolution is 16 megapixels.

If anyone was holding their breaths for 4k video – no, the E-M5 II won’t deliver it either, but note that the sensor in the E-M1 is 4k capable, and access to that mode may in future be given via the LightSnow firmware hack.